Movie Review: “The Boss”

The-Boss-Poster
CONTRIBUTED/ON THE DAY

Barb Young —

 

Melissa McCarthy may have won everyone’s hearts with her lip-sync performance on Jimmy Fallon’s show last week, but her new movie is not blowing anyone away.

The comedy produced by McCarthy herself is a comedy like any other. Twenty minutes into the film I knew the film wasn’t going to be worth watching ever again.

“The Boss” follows the life of Michelle Darnell (McCarthy), the 20-something-est and wealthiest woman in the world. Her assistant, Claire (Kristen Bell), is a hard-working and underpaid single mother. When Michelle’s business suddenly goes bankrupt due to an underhanded scheme by Renault (Peter Dinklage), the ex-tycoon is forced to move in with Claire and her daughter Rachel (Ella Anderson). “Hilarity” ensues.

The biggest problem I have with the film is the plot. The acting was fine and the production value was great. There was just so much plot to fit into a single 99-minute movie.

I should also state, to further my persona of stick-in-the-mud, I rarely enjoy comedies, so it wasn’t wholly surprising I wasn’t blown away by this film. However, when the majority of the film goes for jokes centered on girls touching each other’s boobs and bad dick jokes drawn out over an extended period of time, you really can’t blame me for not finding this funny. It might appeal to the 13-year-old crowd, but with an R rating they kind of missed their mark.

I could go on about the turn comedy has taken as of late and how the drawn out awkward conversation isn’t actually that funny, but I won’t. Just for you people. But know that if that style of comedy isn’t your speed, then neither is this film.

One good thing I can say about the film is it had heart. They tried to make the characters as human as possible and not caricatures, which I appreciate. The movie had a good overall message, even if it was clouded by ridiculousness at times.

Overall, the movie wasn’t awful, the acting was notably higher quality than the plot, and considering one was a child, I think that means something. However, the thick plot and immature humor brought the whole film down for me. Melissa McCarthy has her moments, but this film wasn’t one of them.

C+

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